October 23, 2017

“God is in the structure.”
— Richard Preston, author, The Demon in the Freezer

Avoid the ‘muddle in the middle’

The body needs structure, too

My favorite scene in the movie “High Fidelity” is when Rob Gordon (John Cusack) becomes so depressed over his failed love life that he seeks solace in reorganizing his albums.

ORDER, ORDER True for everything from albums to articles: The more appropriate the structural concept, the easier it is for your people to make their way through your material.

ORDER, ORDER True for everything from albums to articles: The more appropriate the structural concept, the easier it is for your people to make their way through your material.

His nerdy pal Dick (Todd Louiso) is curious about the project. “Are you going to file them alphabetically?” Dick asks.

Nope, Rob answers.

“Chronologically?” Dick presses.

Nope, Rob replies.

“Not …” Dick gasps.

“Yep,” Rob says. “Autobiographically.”

Then he’ll have to remember, say, whom he was dating when he first heard Fleetwood Mac’s “Rumours” to find the album.

When it comes to music, the right organizing structure can help you navigate your collection more efficiently. The same thing’s true with organizing the body of your story: The more appropriate the structural concept, the easier it is for your readers to make their way through your copy.

Develop the story in the body.

The body of the story includes one or more sections in which you explore the subject of the story in more detail. If the nut graph is where you tell readers what you’re going to tell them, the body is where you tell them.

Too often, writers understand the importance of strong beginnings and strong endings. But they simply throw all their other material into the body of their piece.

I call the result “the muddle in the middle” — a big blob of information in no particular order.

Five ways to whip your body into shape

The best organizing principle for your piece depends on your topic. In designing the shape of your copy, as in designing so many things, form should follow function.

People don’t drive alphabetically, points out Richard Saul Wurman, author of Information Architects. Why, then, are atlases organized that way?

To avoid the muddle in the middle, figure out how your readers would really use your information. Then choose one of these five organizing principles to whip your body into shape.

Wurman uses the acronym LATCH to demonstrate how to organize information. “There are only five ways to do it,” he says. They are:

  • Location. Move geographically — city to city, state to state or country to country, for instance.
  • Alphabet. Organize from A to Z.
  • Time. Progress chronologically, from beginning to middle to end.
  • Category. Tackle your topic thematically.
  • Hierarchy. Structure from most important to least.

So choose the approach that makes the most sense for your topic — and your readers. And don’t produce an atlas that’s arranged from A to Z.

Five is all it takes.

I have yet to find a type of story that doesn’t fit into one of these five organizing schemes.

  • Q&As, for instance, should be organized thematically. If you’re organizing yours chronologically, using the structure of the interview, think again!
  • How-to articles, aka service pieces, generally run from first step to last. In other words, they’re chronological.
  • Lists are usually organized hierarchically, thematically or chronologically.

So if you master these five structural principles, you’ll have all the tools you need to organize any story.

And note: “Autobiographically” is not on the list.

Build a solid structure

Want to master a story structure that increases readership instead of cutting it short?

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“The oldest and best advice in the business is: The tougher it is to tell, the slower and simpler you tell it.”
— Bob Levey, Washington Post columnist

Is Obamacare readable?

AP asks Ann to evaluate online training program

Forget everything you think or know about Obamacare.

CAN YOU READ ME NOW? Some passages of the Illinois online 'Obamacare' training program weigh in at the 14.5th grade level.

CAN YOU READ ME NOW? Some passages of the Illinois online ‘Obamacare’ training program weigh in at the 14.5th grade level.

Does it represent the country’s worst slide into socialism since our founding fathers tweedled their fifes and thumped their drums in 1776? Or does it offer a much-needed basket of rainbows and kittens to all Americans? Those questions are the least of our worries.

The real question is: Is it readable?

That’s the question Carla K. Johnson, Associated Press medical writer based in Chicago, asked me one day in August.

Can they read this?

Carla sent me four samples of text from an online training program. The program was developed for Illinois outreach workers who will help people sign up for insurance benefits under the new health law.

Many of the outreach workers, Carla told me, have a high school diploma or GED and no college education. Some have college degrees.

Will they be able to read it? Carla asked.

No, they won’t, I answered.

How do we know?

I used StoryToolz readability analyzer to study these passages:

“Payment of the penalty is through the federal income tax return and is $95 per individual and $285 per family in 2014 or 1 percent of family income whichever is greater. It will increase in future years.”

“Applicants expect that we keep information about them confidential, sharing it only with people who need the information to do their jobs.”

“Individuals must report changes in income to the Marketplace in order to assure that the premium tax credit is correct and the federal government is not overpaying on behalf of the consumer. This will help the consumer avoid a reconciliation at the end of the tax year in which they would have to pay back taxes. Additionally, consumers do not have to take the entire premium tax credit in advance of filing taxes.”

“Medicaid eligibility is organized by category or population each of which has different rules for how much income and resources you can have. For the most part, only citizens and qualified immigrants can qualify. The largest Medicaid categories covering most eligible individuals are Children under age 19, Parents raising children under age 19, Pregnant Women, Individuals 65 and older, and Persons with Disabilities.”

These passages weigh in at the 9.2nd, 11.8th, 12th and 14.5th grade levels on the Flesch-Kincaid grade level scale, respectively.

All are too difficult for outreach workers with high school diplomas and GEDs to read easily. But these passages will also put off workers with college degrees.

Some context on readability

Why?

More than four out of 10 Americans have basic or below basic prose skills, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (PDF).

That’s the latest in a series of NAALs.

These folks can sign forms, compare ticket prices for two events and look up shows in a TV guide. But they have trouble finding places on a map, calculating the cost of office supplies from a catalog and comparing viewpoints in two editorials.

If you’re writing at the 14.5th grade level, you’re reaching only 13 percent of your audience members.

The question for writers of this online training program is: Are you smart enough to write for a fifth grader?

How can we improve these passages?

It would be simple to make all of these passages easier to read by:

  • Listing lists
  • Making words shorter
  • Tightening sentences
  • Writing directly to the reader in the second person
  • Covering people doing things instead of programs and procedures

Here’s what these passages might look like after editing for readability:

BeforeReading levelAfterReading level
Payment of the penalty is through the federal income tax return and is $95 per individual and $285 per family in 2014 or 1 percent of family income whichever is greater. It will increase in future years.9.2The 2014 penalty is whichever of these is more:

  • $95 per individual
  • $285 per family
  • 1% of family income

Penalties will increase in the future. If you owe a penalty, you’ll pay through your federal income tax return.

5.3
Applicants expect that we keep information about them confidential, sharing it only with people who need the information to do their jobs.11.8Keep information about applicants confidential. Share the information only with people who need it to do their jobs.7.6
Individuals must report changes in income to the Marketplace in order to assure that the premium tax credit is correct and the federal government is not overpaying on behalf of the consumer. This will help the consumer avoid a reconciliation at the end of the tax year in which they would have to pay back taxes. Additionally, consumers do not have to take the entire premium tax credit in advance of filing taxes.12You must report changes in your income to the Marketplace. That will ensure that your premium tax credit is correct and that the federal government doesn’t overpay on your behalf. This way, you can avoid having to pay back taxes at the end of the tax year.Also, you don’t have to take the entire premium tax credit before filing taxes.8.5
Medicaid eligibility is organized by category or population each of which has different rules for how much income and resources you can have. For the most part, only citizens and qualified immigrants can qualify. The largest Medicaid categories covering most eligible individuals are Children under age 19, Parents raising children under age 19, Pregnant Women, Individuals 65 and older, and Persons with Disabilities.14.5Are you eligible for Medicaid? That depends on who you are, how high your income is and how many other resources you have. The largest groups of people who qualify for Medicaid are:

  • Children under 19
  • Parents raising children under 19
  • Pregnant women
  • People 65 and older
  • People with disabilities
5.1

Read the AP story.

How readable is your copy?
Are you reaching the readers you hope to reach?

October writing contest: Readability before and after

For this month’s contest, find a hard-to-read passage and rewrite it to increase readability. Send me the before and after, along with the readability scores for each (get them from StoryToolz readability analyzer) by Nov. 1.

If yours is the best entry, I’ll send you my favorite readability-themed gift.

And thanks!

Thank you to Shirley Skeel, media relations manager for The University of Puget Sound, for recommending me to Carla.

Get the word out with clear, compelling copy

Each day, your readers are bombarded with 5,000 attempts to get their attention. That’s nearly 2 million messages a year. Is your copy getting through to your tired, busy, distracted audience?

These days — when people are more inclined to discard information than to read it — you need copy that captures attention, cuts through the clutter and leaves a lasting impression.

Wylie Communications can help. With Wylie Communications on your team, you can:

  • Deliver copy that sells. When Ann’s not writing or editing, she’s training other writers. Or helping companies get the word out to their audiences. She applies the best practices she develops for her training and consulting business to her writing and editing projects. So your project will cut through the clutter, lift your ideas off the page or screen and deliver copy that sells products, services and ideas.
  • Bring award-winning talent to your project. Ann’s work has earned nearly 60 communication awards, including two IABC Gold Quills. Let us help you produce world-class business communications, as well.
  • Get writers who get business. Ann has interviewed George Clooney, Brad Pitt and Robert Redford. But she really enjoys chatting with economists, engineers and surgeons. At Wylie Communications, we’ve written about communication technology for Sprint, about personal finance for Northern Trust and — despite the fact that Ann’s preferred form of exercise is the hike from recliner to refrigerator — about fitness medicine for the Mayo Clinic. We’ll get up-to-speed on your industry, quickly and thoroughly.
  • Stop working weekends. Our team provides a virtual staff to write and edit newsletters and magazines for Saint Luke’s, Northern Trust, State Street/Kansas City and Sprint. Let us pick up the slack in your department, too.

Want to reach more readers? To discuss your next writing project, contact Ann Wylie. We’ll deliver copy that gets read and remembered.

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“We’re still writing news releases the same way Ivy Lee did when he invented the release in 1906.”
— Ann Wylie, president, Wylie Communications Inc.

Shake it up

Osborn Barr reimagines a press release

When Rachel McGrew, manager at Osborn Barr PR, wrote a release about a client product, her first instinct was to take the traditional route.

Before: a traditional PR 101 release

McGrew’s first draft used conventional approaches that rarely stand out from the crowd, let alone generate a great deal of interest and coverage.

PR 101 releases tend to:

  • Focus on the client’s stuff, not the readers’ needs
  • Lead with a dry, familiar news announcement
  • Include longish paragraphs, sentences, phrases and words
  • Make copy impossible to scan with one long, unbroken block of text

Here’s how that looked:

New Mobile Application Makes Pen-and-Paper Crop Scouting Obsolete

Rev!ID Partners with SST Software to Revolutionize Crop Scouting

The new agriculture crop scouting application, Rev!ID, hit the market last week with a revolutionary approach. Rev!ID is a mobile all-in-one tool that allows crop consultants, growers, retailers and field scouts to work independently or together from a single program. Rev!ID is the first mobile app that allows you to scout more than 300 crops and track/identify over 1,500 issue types.

The use of mobile technology in the field continues to rise, and Rev!ID joins forces with some of the most innovative and influential information technology companies in the world. Among them is SST Software, the leader in agriculture information management.

Rev!ID leverages the power of the SST agX issue and crop taxonomy data. In addition, a revolutionary feature is Rev!ID’s field boundary integration. Users can draw their own field lines, upload a shape file or utilize Rev!ID’s automated sync with boundary providers such as SST Summit.

AGE BEFORE BEAUTY In this 'before" example, Osborn Barr communicators went with an old-fashioned, PR 101 release.

BEEN HERE BEFORE In this ‘before’ example, Osborn Barr communicators went with an old-fashioned, PR 101 release. See the rewrite, below.

“The partnership with SST for field boundary record integration is so critical for scouting,” said Mark Green, vice president and general manager, Rev!Co. “Today, retailers and consultants are using multiple files to manage records about farm fields. With Rev!ID, we integrate a retailer or consultant’s existing SST Summit field boundaries so the scouting information is captured on one set of field records. This increases efficiencies and accuracy of data.”

The need for the pen and paper process of crop scouting is obsolete with Rev!ID. Users can take pictures of scouting events with their mobile device, create field-specific reports and email results to retailers, applicators and growers.

Also, Rev!ID uses its own “Wiktionary” photo and reference tool to harness the power of group think. This tool allows users to crosscheck photos and diagnoses from the palm of the hand.

Users can also drop pins on maps where they found issues, share this information digitally and see what is most common and accurate across fields. Favorite or common issues can be tagged for quick access to create event reports.

All data is stored on a secured Rev!ID web management site. Users can set up collaborations, manage their account, track their issues, edit reports, download and share. Rev!ID can be downloaded today from the iTunes store. It costs $.01 per acre scouting and $25.00 per month. To get started with Rev!ID, go to www.revidapp.com and create an account, or call 888-721-1971.

“Our mission is to uncover opportunities to create value in the agriculture industry where it’s previously absent or needs advancement,” Green said.

After: a feature story with a WIIFM angle

But then McGrew brought me to Osborn Barr for a Catch Your Reader workshop. After the workshop, she took another whack at the release to:

  • Refocus the message on the readers’ needs instead of just promoting the client’s stuff
  • Surprise and delight readers with a feature-style lead instead of a dry news announcement
  • Make reading easier with bright, tight copy
  • Lift ideas off the screen, making copy more scannable, with subheads, callouts and other display copy

Here’s how that looked:

Pen-and-Paper Crop Scouting Becoming Obsolete

New mobile application Rev!ID scouts, syncs and saves

ST. LOUIS (July 29, 2013)— In 2013, tractors can practically drive themselves, and farmers tweet up to five times a day. But crop scouting is still done with pen and paper. This technology gap in the ag industry costs farmers and retailers time and money.

Now, thanks to a new software solutions company, Rev!Co™, crop scouting joins the digital age, offering farmers and their retailers the ability to electronically scout and record common crop issues. In real time. In one single application. The company’s scouting application, Rev!ID™, provides consultants and field scouts one central tool and field reference that leverages integration of the farmer or retailer’s precision ag field boundary data.

With its powerful tools and timesaving functionality,
Rev!ID enhances the value of field scouting
in the 21st century.

Rev!ID hit the market May 1, 2013. It’s the first mobile-all-in-one scouting tool with capabilities to scout more than 300 crops. The app also has a reference library of more than 1,500 issue types. Farmers, retailers, crop consultants and field scouts can work independently or together and collaborate via Rev!ID for synchronized records.

Rev!Co partners with SST Software

Rev!Co works with some of the most innovative and influential technology companies in the world. One partner is SST Software, the leader in agricultural information management.

The Rev!Co scouting app, Rev!ID leverages the power of SST’s agX issue and crop taxonomy data to drive the recording of field-level issues and disorders. In addition, within the iPad app, users can automatically sync with boundary providers such as SST Software through the Rev!ID open API. Users can also draw their own field boundary lines or upload .shp files.

“Today, retailers and consultants use multiple files to manage records about farm fields,” said Mark Green, Vice President, Rev!Co. “With Rev!ID, we deliver value to the retailer in two specific ways – we integrate existing SST Summit field boundaries capturing scouting data on the same field boundaries that the retailer services the farmer. And two, the scouting data can be an important input to the operational analysis for the farmer by the retailer’s precision ag departments.”

Geared for success

Connected with the Rev!Co retailer management software platform, Rev!Matic™ , retailer field sales consultants now have a real-time view of what is happening on and around the fields of their customers, and can take immediate action or see what was ordered to resolve a scouting issue.

Users can take pictures of scouting events with their mobile device and create field-specific reports. Then, they can email results back to the retail office, applicators and farmers.

Rev!ID also uses its own “Wiktionary” photo and reference tool to harness the power of groupthink. With this tool, users can cross-check photos and diagnoses from the palm of the hand.

All data is stored on a secured Rev!ID Web management site. Users can set up collaborators for shared scouting events, manage multiple accounts and users and invoicing, track issues, edit and customize reports, download and share.

Rev!ID can be downloaded today from the iTunes store. It costs $.01 per acre and $25.00 per month. To get started, visit www.revidapp.com and create an account, or call 888-721-1971.

The result?

“We’ve already gotten some amazing coverage,” McGrew says. “It was picked up by Ag Professional (among many others).”

How can you reboot your traditional releases to increase interest and coverage?

Reach bloggers, journalists and readers

Want to master the art of writing successful media relations materials?

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“Writing for the Web isn’t taking what you wrote in Word, hitting control-C and pasting it into a Web page.”
— Chris Williams, FedEx content manager

One Smart site

PetSmartCharities.org reaches readers online

More than 400,000 dogs and cats find homes each year through PetSmart Charities’ in-store adoption programs and events. In fact, the organization grants more money to directly help pets in need than any other animal welfare group in North America.

But how to get the word out?

Online communications manager Heather Vana and the other smart folks at PetSmart Charities recently rebooted PetSmartCharities.org to more effectively reach readers online. (Disclosure: I developed templates for and edited the animal welfare professionals site.)

Here’s how they did it — and how you can do it, too:

1. Get to the point faster.

Online visitors view most Web pages for 10 seconds or less. Fewer than one in 10 page views extend beyond two minutes — and that includes those left open in background windows.

To reach impatient online visitors, get to the point faster. PetSmartCharities.org accomplished that with clear — not clever — headlines, blurbs, buttons and other display copy:

rur_131000_ (3)

2. Chunk it up.

Want to help Web visitors find, read and understand information online? Break Web copy into short pages and hyperlink those pages together.

PetSmart Charities, for instance, doesn’t deliver a single long page with all of the details about each type of grant it offers. Instead, the site divides and conquers, moving details about each type of grant to a separate page.

rur_131000_ (4)

3. Write it tight.

Web visitors process only about 20 percent of the words on a page. But add more words, and that percentage goes down. Shorter is better.

So do all of the things you do to make your print copy clear and concise, only more so. Make Web copy hyper-crisp for the hyper-world.

To accomplish this, Vana gave writers guidelines and tips for writing short Web pages, headlines, decks, leads, paragraphs, sentences and words

4. Make it scannable.

Online, “readers” don’t read. They scan. In fact, half of all Web visitors don’t actually read the paragraphs, according to The Poynter Institute’s EyeTrack07 study.

So how can you get the word out on the Web? Lift your ideas off the screen with display copy.

Vana’s team used lists, subheads, bold-faced lead-ins and other display copy to lift ideas off the screen:

rur_131000_ (5)

5. Cut the fluff.

Web visitors are looking for specific facts more than 95 percent of the time. Why, then, do we lard up our Web copy with hype and marketing fluff, burying our data points under a layer of fat?

To make your Web page more than 25 percent more usable, increase the facts and cut the fluff.

To do so:

Avoid adjectives, adverbs and other modifiers and hyperbole.

Deliver concrete, tangible evidence through:

  • Startling statistics
  • Analogies, metaphors and similes
  • Fun facts, juicy details
  • Examples, for instances
  • Stories, narratives, anecdotes and scenarios
  • Testimonials and sound bites

PetSmartCharities.org uses specific, tangible details — not vague, hyperbolic chest-banging — to tell its stories through passages like this:

rur_131000_ (8)

6. Make it friendly.

Visitors like websites that have the personalities of … well … people — not the personalities of organizations.

So go ahead: Loosen your tie.

To do so:

  • Activate the passive voice
  • Write in the second person
  • Drop the jargon and bureaucratese
  • Make it conversational
  • Bring your personality to work

PetSmartCharities.org comes off as a group of people, not an institution, with copy like this:

rur_131000_ (6)

Pictures help too. After all, it doesn’t get much friendlier than this:

rur_131000_ (9a)

What approaches can you steal from PetSmartCharities.org?
How can you refresh your website using these best practices in Web writing?

Web Writing Boot Camp

When reading on the screen, your audience members suffer physical ailments ranging from double vision to nausea to difficulty thinking. No wonder people avoid reading online!

In this workshop, you’ll learn a six-step process for writing Web copy that overcomes the obstacles of online reading. Specifically, you’ll learn how to:

  • Increase usability by 124% with three simple copywriting steps
  • Create Web copy that works with, not against, readers’ natural online reading habits
  • Run a quick test to make sure your copy gets to the point fast enough
  • Go beyond WWWWWH to include the two elements that really need to be included in an online lead
  • Determine how long your Web page should be. (Beware: Many page-length recommendations are based on outdated research)
  • Apply the 30-3-30-3 rule to give online readers what they’re looking for
  • Chunk your copy instead of irritating the reader by chopping it
  • Develop a voice for your online communications

Ready to bring me in for a Web Writing Boot Camp? Contact me today.

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“Every good title is a short story.”
— Russell Banks, American writer of fiction and poetry

Quote, unquote

Readers share colloquial headlines

After reporting on award-winning colloquial headlines in a recent issue, I asked you to share your best quote, colloquialism or sound bite headline and deck.

Twist a phrase.

Most of you shared clever, creative headlines that I’d call twist of phrase headlines, not sound bite headlines. (This is obviously my report card for clarity in the original article!)

Here are the best of that bunch:

Opportunity Knocks! On Wood?

Conservative company finds liberal growth
in an untapped wood market.

— Raymond E. De Vries,
communicator at The Timken Company

Eagan Police Take It to the Tweets

In an effort to better serve the public,
the Eagan Police Department announces
the creation of an Eagan Police Department
Twitter page.

— Joanna Foote,
communications coordinator
at City of Eagan, Minnesota

What the Cluck?

A University of Missouri professor
created a vegetarian chicken substitute
good enough to fool carnivores
and hatch a company

— Loring Leifer, chief copywriter, WordsWorth

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 MINUTES

A trip across the globe would be very expensive.
Fortunately for our families and community,
Central Kitsap School District
provides one for free every year.

— RandaLyn Novick, district spokeswoman
for Central Kitsap School District

Seeing the writing on the wire

Synchrophasors give BPA a glimpse
into the future of the grid

— Kristel Turner, public affairs specialist,
at Bonneville Power Administration

I love them all! But a true colloquial headline is a sound bite or quote. It sounds like something someone would actually say in this situation.

And the winner is …

‘No, Webex, we can’t be friends’

Our Webex contract with Verizon
expires at the end of July,
so it’s time to start thinking
about an amicable split

— Hillary Dobbs, senior copywriter,
Publications, at Black Hills Corporation

Hillary, I love this sound bite headline. The only piece of advice I’d share is to avoid repeating words from the headline in the deck.

Still, this is a textbook example of the form, and I hope you really ran it in one of your publications. Please watch your mailbox for a little headline-related gift from me.

And thank you all for playing!

Rev Up Readership

Want to reach more readers by revitalizing your publication, website or blog?

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“One of the most informative sessions I’ve had on how to write like a pro and influence readers.”
— Edward Lewis, Director, stakeholder and media relations, Toyota

Book Ann now and save

Lock in this year’s fees for next year’s programs

Because of increasing demand for my programs, I’ll be increasing the fees for my writing workshops on Jan. 2. Now, for a limited time, you can lock in 2013 fees for 2014 programs.

To get this year’s fees for next year’s programs, you must complete booking (that is, get a signed contract and deposit to me) by Dec. 31.

To book a program, contact me today.

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“I learned more in three hours of Ann’s one workshop than three full days of others’. A powerful presentation.”
— Leanne Ingle, PR specialist, Timberland Regional Library District

Ann’s touring schedule

Polish your skills at one of these events

Alas, I can’t invite you to the in-house seminars I present for private organizations.

COME ALONG FOR THE RIDE Catch Ann at one of her upcoming workshops.

But everyone’s invited to these upcoming public seminars in:

  • New York City on Dec. 2. Catch Your Readers, a full-day workshop for PRSA
  • Philadelphia on Oct 27. Writing for Social Media, a half-day pre-conference session for the PRSA World Conference
  • Philadelphia on Oct 28. Cut Through the Clutter, 75-minute breakout session for the PRSA World Conference
  • Salt Lake City on May 15: Think Like a Reader, a 90-minute preconference session, and Cut Through the Clutter, a 90-minute keynote, for the Salt Lake City PRSA chapter’s Spring Conference.
  • Tulsa, Okla., on Nov. 20.  Catch Your Readers, a one-day workshop for IABC/Tulsa
  • Your own home or office on Jan. 30: Write for Readability, a one-hour webinar for PRSA

Would you like to attend? Please contact meeting planners directly for details.

Can’t make these events? If you’d like to bring me in for a workshop at your organization, contact me.

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Where in the world is Ann?

Cut your training costs when you piggyback your program

Save money when you piggyback your workshop by scheduling it when I’m already “in the neighborhood.” Book your program the day before or after another organization’s and split my airfare and ground transportation with the other group.

Ask about piggybacking on my upcoming engagements in:

  • Austin, Texas: Nov. 7
  • Cincinnati: Nov. 13
  • Kansas City, Mo.: Oct. 10-13
  • Minneapolis: Oct. 9
  • New York City: Dec. 2
  • Philadelphia: Oct. 27-28
  • Salt Lake City: May 15
  • Tulsa, Okla.: Nov. 20

Save even more: Ask about my communication-association discounts and second-day fee reductions.

Contact me to discuss piggybacking.

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What are we up to?

The folks at Wylie Communications have been enjoying:

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Keep up with my calendar

Find out when I’m coming to your neighborhood, learn when you can sign up for one of my programs and otherwise keep up with my calendar.

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Please share this issue

… with two of your colleagues by directing them to our current issue. Better yet, invite them to subscribe to Wylie’s Writing Tips. They’ll thank you — and so will I!

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For more info …

… about my seminars, publication consulting or writing and editing services, please contact me or visit my website.

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